The Waite-Smith Tarot Card Deck

This set of cards was designed in 1909 by the great authority on the Tarot and revered mystic Arthur Edward Waite with the help of artist Pamela Coleman Smith. The two met at a meeting of The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, a magical order from the late 19th century devoted to the study and practice of the occult, metaphysics and paranormal activities, a group that has influenced modern witchcraft and Wicca.

For Waite, Tarot cards belonged in a different realm than fortune-telling cards or gypsy cards. With the Tarot cards you gained insight to your question through divination and help from a supernatural agency. Your social character in a religious context came into play. You could find help in perplexing situations by shuffling the deck and reading the cards, and it was no more random than opening a bible, putting a finger on a passage, and gaining insight to what is troubling you.

Waite drew his inspiration from the Marseille Tarot Deck seen here, which was introduced to France, from Italy, in the late 15th century. He gave Pamela Coleman Smith instructions based on the design of this set, but not being an artist himself, he let Smith have artistic license, especially on the minor cards.

Marseille_Tarot_Cards

And look how beautiful they are!

Rider Waite-Smith Tarot Cards Rider Waite-Smith Tarot Cards Rider Waite-Smith Tarot Cards Rider Waite-Smith Tarot Cards Rider Waite-Smith Tarot CardsRider Waite-Smith Tarot Cards

About redbudart

I live in the beautiful Pacific Northwest, just outside of Portland, Oregon. My passions are cuisine, wine, horticulture, art, and my two grown children who couldn't be farther away, and couldn't be any more wonderful than they are. I moved here in 2014, work a day job in finance, and spend the rest of my time working on my dream of living off the land, and teaching young people how to as well. Stop by my Etsy shops, where all proceeds are going towards the goal. Thank you and Namaste!
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